If you are a long-time statin user, you may be less likely to develop gallstone, a study in Denmark suggests.



The study, published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, says that for those who are receiving at least five prescriptions of statin, their risk of developing gallstones fell by 11 to 24 percent. 


The more prescriptions, the larger the decrease, the study adds.

In the study, researchers reviewed data collected from 1.7 million people living in Northern Denmark. They found that nearly 33,000 people developed gallstones between 1996 and 2008.


After accounting for diseases linked to gallstones like liver and heart problems, people with at least five statin prescriptions were found to have lower rates of gallstones than people who did not take the drug. 

Those with 20 or more prescriptions had also a 24-percent decrease in their chances of developing gallstones compared with non-users.
Dr. Rune Erichsen of the Aarhus University Hospital, study author, told Reuters in an e-mail:

"Statins reduce the synthesis of cholesterol, so less cholesterol is excreted in the liver, and the risk of gallstone disease eventually seems to decrease."

Statins have been shown to increase rates of liver dysfunction, kidney failure, muscle weakness and cataracts in some population.