Do we know any Smartphone application that informs us about  storms/typhoons, earthquakes, fires, accidents or mud slides in the Cordillera region?

For sure, it’s a NO. Currently, we are still using traditional techniques to inform everyone about calamities and disasters.

In other countries, we have different disaster apps that tracks typhoon route, provides first- aid measures, hit hotline during unusual incidents and automatically report disasters to the authority and people around a concerned area.

Undeniably, disaster smartphone apps are speedier and more convenient in terms of its reach to target people.

Now, a group of Information Technology students from Saint Louis University are conducting a research on the probability of developing a disaster software app that will soon run on Nokia, Cherry, MyPhone, Apple, BlackBerry and other existing mobile phones in the market.

For the study and beta version of the disaster smartphone app, the researchers will run it on phones using Google's Android which is one of the most common OS in the country.

The students are interested in building a disaster smartphone app that allows us to:

a. Get direct updates from agencies, like Philippine Information Agency (PIA), Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical Astronimical Services Authority (PAGASA), Red Cross, and Cordillera Risk Reduction and Management Council (CRDMC) on any possible disastrous natural phenomena

b. Report any incident and accident that we have witnessed for proper coordination purposes with the authority

c. Outreach victims of disasters by giving financial donations and other help that we can provide

d.  Learn more about safety precautions and life-saving methods during disasters and share these tips to our neighbors and other people in our circle

However, this noble thought cannot be turned into reality without our help. Please let's take time answering the survey. After completing the survey, please let's share it with others. Thank you. I believe this study helps in preventing tragedies like what happened  to Little Kibungan in La Trinidad (read my CNN iReport on this)

Click below to start answering the survey :)