(Note: This is a copy of my speech I delivered a while ago)

A frank cousin of mine once told me that she adores me because I can listen to terrifying funeral songs even when I’m lying in bed at night.

“Amazing Grace”
“Nella Fantasia”
“A Time For Us”
“Scarborough Fair”
“Danny Boy”
“You Raise Me Up”

To her, these songs bring back sad and painful memories.

But to me, these are the ultimate songs of heartening hope and of unconditional love.

I unchain my soul from bad energies by tuning in to both Celtic and Classical music genres. Both genres bring me to the relaxing nature up to the endless horizon of life.

Call me “weird”, but this is me. This is what I prefer to listen to, to uplift my morale, find my deep worth and explore the open space even with closed eyes.

As everyone knows, I am a big fan of both Celtic and Classical music genres. Celtic music originated in the greens hills of Ireland. Among the most popular Celtic artists include Enya, Celtic Woman, Celtic Thunder and the High Kings.

On the other hand, Classical music is known for trembling voices that we hear from Andrea Bocelli and Il Divo when they stage shows in London’s West End or Prince Albert Hall.

My favorite classical singer is English soprano Sarah Brightman who is known for playing ‘Christine’ in ‘Phantom of the Opera’.

Honestly, both Celtic and Classical music talk about extreme emotions like despair, sorrow and death. This is the reason why we usually sing the earlier mentioned songs when someone dies.

But when you listen closely to the songs, you see a sweet ray of light and feel the warmth of the words.

Say for instance the song “You Raise Me Up”. We may find it an anthem during funerals. But look again, it can be sung during happy weddings, momentous graduation ceremonies and electrifying victories.


Today before we sleep, we review the lyrics of “You Raise Me Up” and tell me tomorrow if it’s really a song for the dead.